Tip: Remember to follow anti-static precautions and at the very least, grounding yourself on a radiator or piece of earthed equipment before handling any components. Handle components carefully by holding only the sides of the PCB and not the contacts or components.

Step One: Preparing your case

Before fitting your motherboard into the case we first need to prepare it by fitting the motherboard risers and the motherboards I/O shield (Input / Output shield).

Cases come with a variety of different options for fitting the motherboard risers depending on the form factor of your motherboard (Fig.A). The best way to ensure you’re fitting them correctly is by placing the board in and out of the case and ensuring that you are lining the risers up correctly with the corresponding holes in the motherboard (Fig.B).

Once you’ve got all of the right holes lined up and your risers fitted (Fig.C), you’re ready to fit the I/O shield (Fig.D). These can be a little tricky to fit but they simply press into the case. One thing to remember is to line up the I/O ports with the motherboard to ensure the correct orientation of the I/O shield.

Step Two: Fitting and connecting your motherboard

Once you’re ready to fit the board simply line up one of the corners of the board with the thread in the riser and work your way around the board (Fig.E & Fig.F). I personally suggest keeping the screws a little loose until you’ve got all of them in and then going round and tightening them all up. The reason for this is that keeping the screws loose allows you to move the board around slightly if some of the screw holes don’t line up perfectly.

Once you have your motherboard fitted you need to connect the front panel connectors to the motherboard, your front panel cables are usually situated towards the front of your case and should be labelled; USB, Audio, Power Switch, etc. (Fig.G). This part can vary but your motherboard's instruction manual should cover how to fit these.

Once they’re all connected (Fig.H) you have successfully fitted your motherboard into your case.

Again a relatively simple process and one step closer to building your own computer.

If you haven’t seen our other guides you can find Part One and Two of this series on the links below:

Back to the The Complete Computer Assembly Guide

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