Ubisoft has said it is looking to change the way in which it offers digital rights management (DRM) on its PC games.

The developer has not always been held in the highest regard by gamers, largely for the over-zealous way in which it has handled DRM, but it has signalled intentions to change its ways.

Chief executive officer Yves Guillemot had looked to defend the company's stance by saying that PC games see a piracy rate of between 93 and 95 per cent.

This wasn't backed up by any specific statistics so this, coupled with the 'always-online' DRM software that Ubisoft used, meant it was largely unpopular with people who play PC-based games.

However, after worldwide director for online games Stephanie Perotti and corporate communications manager Michael Burk spoke to Rock, Paper, Shotgun things seem to be improving.

While the pair stopped short of apologising for their previous stance, with Perotti only describing the reaction of gamers as "unfortunate", there were more positive signs.

"We have listened to feedback, and since June last year our policy for all of PC games is that we only require a one-time online activation when you first install the game, and from then you are free to play the game offline," she said.

"We will continue to listen to feedback, we will continue to make sure that we deliver great games and great services, and are now operating under this policy."

In further positive news for PC gamers, it was confirmed within the interview that for popular games such as Assassin's Creed III a one-time activation setting will be used with no limits on the number of devices a game can be installed on.

Ms Perotti added that Ubisoft is "committed to continue to improve on that front and continue to release PC games as close as possible to console releases".

She cited Far Cry 3's day-and-date release on consoles and PCs as well as Assassin's Creed III's coming to PC only a few weeks late as examples of this.ADNFCR-1220-ID-801446173-ADNFCR
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