Computer manufacturers are planning to create touch ultrabooks, in order to keep up with the functions offered by Windows 8.

According to DigiTimes, a number of firms are now looking at touchscreens, but the general consensus is that fundamental design concepts will have to change to accommodate them.

The key theme running throughout the development of the ultrabook sector has been thinner, thinner and thinner again. Initial costs have been high, but these have slowly been dropping.

However, manufacturers have told DigiTimes that bringing in a touchscreen will set both of these development areas back.

Costs will naturally go up, while screens will have to be between seven and 15 millimetres thicker.

As a way to potentially combat these problems, vendors such as these are said to be looking at developing more transforming designs.

Lenovo, Asustek Computer and Acer are already in well underway, with the former looking to release the Yoga later this year.

Most of the models are likely to involve a change to the hinge system, turning the traditional ultrabook/notebook style into a tablet PC, but this will involve a major rethink.

The magazine states: "Notebook hinge makers pointed out that with the existing clamshell designs of ultrabooks, the panel could easily move around while users are operating through a touchscreen, but if they strengthen the hinge's torque, it could easily flip up the bottom part of the notebook."

However, some will also be experimenting with sliding screens to get the same results.

Intel is beginning a significant push in the ultrabook market, with upwards of 65 devices containing its chips coming out this year.

As part of the company's campaign, it recently took to the streets using 60 synchronised ultrabooks to create a flash pop-up theatre in Los Angeles.ADNFCR-1220-ID-801297609-ADNFCR
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