In Win are a name that is gaining traction - hah car pun - in the case market, having a slew of cases available ranging from simple and clean cases for business and home use to crazy concept designs like the H-Frame and the Tou which is a case made with glass rather than perspex panels.

Today I am going to be looking at one of In Win’s gaming mid-tower cases the GT1 which is available in black and white, we will be looking at the black one.

About In Win

The distinctive, lively red In Win logo,
derived from the Chinese
calligraphy "?", symbolizes "??"
or "Satisfaction, according to one’s wishes".
With no sharp edges, the logo also portrays a state of energetic harmony between technology and art. Thus, our slogan "Contemporary and Innovative" serves as the foundation of not only our product development but also our attitudes in serving and catering to our strategic partner’s wishes. We take the "im" out of "impossible"… …A brand without persistence is only a name.




Case Size

Mid Tower


SECC Steel/Plastic

Drive Bays

External 5.25” x 3 Internal 3.5” / 2.5” x 6 (Supports up to SATA HDD EZ-Swap Module x 4), 2.5” x 2

M/B Form Factor

ATX / Micro-ATX

Power Supply

ATX 12V, PSII Size

I/O Expansion Slots

PCI-E Slot x 7 (Supports up to 408mm)

Top Port

Fan Speed Controller

3.5”/2.5” SATA HDD EZ-Swap x 1

Front Ports

USB 3.0 x 1 (Internal Connector)

USB 2.0 x 2

HD Audio

Thermal Solution

Supports up to Total 120mm Fan x 8 (Different Regions May Carry Different Specification)

Front - Supports 120mm Fan x 1 (Maximum Supports 120mm Fan x 2)

Rear - Supports 120mm Red LED Fan x 1

Side - Supports up to 120mm Fan x 2 (Mesh Side Panel Version Only)

Top - Supports up to 120mm Fan x 2

Bottom - Supports up to 120mm Fan x 1

Water-Cooling Ready



(H x W x D)  475 x 210 x 491mm (18.7” x 8.3” x 19.3”)




The In Win GT1 comes in a fairly standard brown box, which is peppered with info relating to the case inside
The box features a partial image of the case itself on the front, whilst the reverse features a picture of a car - which bears a striking resemblance to a Ford Mustang - which I presume is an influence to the case design itself.

Upon opening the box, the first thing you will find is an accessory pack which includes the screws and standoffs needed to fit your hardware inside, a small amount of cable ties, the user manual and some little red honeycombed items which can be clipped in to the front and top panels to give the case a little bit of a customised feel.


The Case 


Getting the case out of the box is nice and easy, the case itself is well packaged and comes sandwiched between two hefty bits of packing foam. The first thing you will see is that the GT1 has a huge side window which takes up the majority of the left side panel itself; it’s a fully clear panel that allows you to see all your shiny hardware in its glory.

The Front panel of the GT1 has been designed with airflow in mind with a large vented mesh design (this design is replicated on the top of the case as well). Behind the front panel there is a 120mm fan which comes equipped with a mesh dust filter. In the roof of the case there are spaces for two further 120mm, these require no additional screws and you can simply clip them in.

The front of the case also has the standard USB 2 and Audio Connectors but also comes equipped with a single USB 3 ports and a 2 mode fan controller (Silent and Turbo). On the top of the case there is also a hard drive docking bay, which is able to take a standard SATA hard drive, the cables for which route inside the case and have standard connectors.


At the bottom of the case you can see the GT1 comes fitted with very chunky feet which raise the case about 2 cm, fitted to the base are also two mesh filters (one for the PSU and one for an additional intake fan) which clip into the base to help reduce the ingress of dust.


Removal of the side panel gets you access to the internals of the case, and it is immediately clear how much room you do get; the motherboard area has lots of room as well as having a large cutout behind the CPU area which allows you to easily fit large coolers which need more secure mounts without having to remove the whole motherboard.



Going in closer, you can see the 7 hard drive bays and 3 optical drive bays these are of a tool free design allowing fitting of both items without any screws. The hard drives use trays that slot in and out of bays at the front of the case. These allow for either a 3.5” hard drive by way of grommets to help reduce vibration or a 2.5”drive which will need to be secured by screws.

Another nice feature is the support for large graphics cards, by way of removing the top set of hard drive bays (highlighted in the image above) removal of the bay also gives access to a 2.5 bay on the top of the bottom cage itself.


The case has a nice amount of cable tidying options, and comes with a bevelled edge at the corner of the motherboard area, which allows you to hide/secure behind, then route to wherever needed; at the bottom of the motherboard tray there is also another large cut out which makes it a breeze to route cables behind the motherboard tray itself from the powersupply.


The In Win GT1 is a nicely built case with good features and a solid feel for its price point, one downside is the fan controller however, because it uses 4 pin Molex connectors for the fans its means that should you want to replace the preinstalled ones or add more (and still use the controller) you will need to purchase adaptors to the use 3 pin connectors – although this is a slight niggle as the fans provided when on silent are certainly quiet enough in their operation.

For me it is hard to see the influences the car design may have had on the case, but the case itself is certainly funky although I have to admit the case itself is not one I personally would choose.

At the moment the black variant of this case is out of stock with an expected date of mid to late December, the white version is readily available by clicking the link below.











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