Connected Data: TransporterConnected Data: Transporter

This is the 2nd blog post in this series, to see the previous entry please click here.

For those who have not come across the Transporter before, it is quite simply an ingenious NAS device that emulates services such as Microsoft’s SkyDrive and the ever popular Dropbox. It is a private cloud storage device for syncing between all your devices, sharing with family and colleagues and protecting your digital files with advanced backup options. With no on-going fees or privacy terms you have complete control over your files and how they are accessed. They are ideal for businesses to use for collaboration, off-site backups, sharing large files and enabling roaming access.

Well so far I have to say I have been thoroughly impressed with the Data Transporter. It has seamlessly allowed me to work on files both at home and at while working at CCL and done exactly what it said it would on the box.

I would love to be able to write about any problems I have had with the device so far but I honestly havm't had any; it has just sat there and done its job without complaint – something usually quite rare for a new storage company so the Drobo pedigree of Connected Data shines through. I will attempt to connect two Data Transporters together at two locations for off-site backup and see if this can trip the simplicity of the Data Transporter up.

Originally I intended to be posting my full review of the device at this stage, however there is a rather interesting 2.0 update due at the end of June, which sets to bring a whole host of additional functionality to the Transporter that would be criminal not to include in the review.

The Transporter 2.0 software is a free update for all new and existing Transporter users (yay!) and features a further simplified user interface which will be very impressive as the Transporter is already the easiest consumer cloud solution out there that I have used. An enhanced file and folder sharing process, Android support to compliment the iOS support currently available and connectivity enhancements to make it even easier to configure out the box.

The sharing interface is particularly interesting as it introduces mechanisms that users of Dropbox will be instantly familiar with. You will be able to click on any folder or files stored on the Transporter and select sharing options, send a link/email to friends and colleagues to access the file or folder remotely. The solution is just such a simple one to a complicated process that I am pleased they have taken inspiration from Dropbox directly for this feature.

There will also be flexible sync options for devices with a limited capacity such as a Netbook, Tablet or Ultrabook. Most of the cloud services currently offer a service where all of your files are synced across all devices or are not available at all on that device. It works brilliantly for a handful of files however when you start reaching the 500GB/1TB of data level (easy with a Data Transporter) it quickly eats up precious hard drive space on your mobile devices. With the Transporter 2.0 update you will be able to keep critical folders in sync and shared while still having the ability to access larger less important folders such as your music collection from any device regardless of its capacity.

Overall the update is very exciting, any improvements to a device that already has “simple” nailed down can only be a good thing. I for one cannot wait to see what this update brings to the end user experience.
Keep an eye out for my full review in the near future.

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