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Artist Uses Excel To Create Japanese Paintings

Making something beautiful out of something incredibly dull takes talent

Tatsuo Horiuchi is a name I never expect to hear, but he's done something so incredible with something highly regarded as a "boring" tool of our daily lives that he is quickly rising to internet fame for his efforts.

While many of us will have used Excel to create a spread sheet that works out our taxes, an invoice or update our weekly targets at work, nothing fancy, in fact more than likely it was incredibly dull and you never really took much notice of the software that created the file you worked on.

Some artists use fine paints and tools, Tatsuo uses Excel, the lesser known art tool of the world where most of us would use Illustrator of Photoshop, or any of the myriad of art packages that can be easily obtained on digital devices. His excuse is that the arts programs were too expensive and Excel came with his computer, so he made the most of what he had and the end result is nothing short of incredible.

Using the AutoShape feature, most often used to make pie charts and graphs, the 73 year old Japanese artist has spent ten years honing his craft, painstakingly reproducing traditional Japanese style paintings in the software. While these images would have been incredible drawn in any software, it's the fact that he used such a mundane program to makes something so unique. I wonder if he even knows it can be used to add up numbers as well as paint? Although he likely uses MS Paint to do his tax returns.